New paper!

Another new paper!  Descriptions of some new carnivorous sponge species from the Southern Ocean!

Hexactinellida (Porifera) from the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean) with a description of three new species

Goodwin, C, Berman, J, Janussen, D, Gocke, C & Hendry, K, 2015, ‘Hexactinellida (Porifera) from the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean) with a description of three new species’. Zootaxa, vol 4126., pp. 207-220

Advertisements

A new year, a new paper!  Descriptions of some of the new sponge species found in the Southern Ocean:

Goodwin, C, Berman, J, Janussen, D, Gocke, C & Hendry, K, 2015, ‘Hexactinellida (Porifera) from the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean) with a description of three new species’. Zootaxa.

 

New paper published from the team! We can use isotopes to show that the formation of unusual skeletons by carnivorous sponges is a totally different process from other sponges, with major implications for how these fascinating organisms grow and mineralise….

Silica stable isotopes and silicification in a carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma sp.

Hendry, K, Swann, G, Leng, M, Sloane, H, Goodwin, C, Berman, J & Maldonado, M 2015, ‘Technical Note: Silica stable isotopes and silicification in a carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma sp.’. Biogeosciences., pp. 3489-3498

Welcome to our Southern Ocean sponge website!

In 2012, we were lucky enough to receive a Leverhulme Trust research project grant to carry out an exciting cross disciplinary study of a fascinating animal from the Southern Ocean around Antarctica. The Southern Ocean is a very important area that is key to our understanding of climate and of the distribution of marine creatures.

We all study very different scientific topics, from taxonomy to chemistry. However, we’re all linked by a passion for the humble deep-sea sponge!

We think our project will lead to a greater understanding of all considered aspects of sponge biology and processes that will provide insight into the biological response of environmental change from the individual animal to whole population.